9/30/12

D is for (Great) Doxology

For the last couple of weeks or so I have had the Great Doxology running through my head.  This is an ancient hymn that is sung/chanted in Eastern Orthodox Matins services.  Our Parish offers Matins services during the school year.  I think the hymn has been on my mind because we’ve just started having Matins again.

According to Orthodox Wiki, the word doxology means a short hymn or verse of praise for the Trinity.  The Western Church has a shortened version and in my [limited] research I discovered that some variations leave our the bit about “Vouchsafe to keep us this day without sin.”  Orthodox Christians are not the only Christians who have doxologies or hymns of praise.  Many liturgical traditions have them.   When I think of NON Orthodox Doxologies I immediately think of the one that begins “Praise God from whom all blessings flow.”

I found this version of the Great Doxology on YouTube.  It is the closest I could find to the version that my parish uses.

 

The Great Doxology

Glory to God in the highest,
and on earth peace,
good will towards men.
We praise Thee;
we bless Thee;
we worship Thee;
we glorify Thee;
we give thanks to Thee
for Thy great glory:
O Lord, Heavenly King,
God the Father Almighty,
O Lord the Only-begotten Son,
Jesus Christ,
and the Holy Spirit,
O Lord God,
Lamb of God,
Son of the Father,
that takest away the sin of the world:
have mercy on us,
Thou that takest away the sins of the world.
Receive our prayer,
Thou that sittest at the right hand of the Father;
and have mercy on us.
For Thou only art holy;
Thou only art Lord,
Jesus Christ,
to the glory of God the Father. Amen.
Every day will I bless Thee,
and I will praise Thy Name for ever,
yea, for ever and ever.
Vouchsafe, O Lord,
to keep us this day without sin.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord, the God of our Fathers,
and praised and glorified is Thy Name unto the ages. Amen.
Let thy mercy, O Lord, be upon us,
according as we have hoped in Thee.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord, teach me Thy statutes.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord, teach me Thy statutes.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord, teach me Thy statutes.
Lord, Thou hast been our refuge from generation to generation.
I said: O Lord, have mercy on me;
heal my soul, for I have sinned against Thee.
Lord, unto Thee have I fled for refuge;
teach me to do Thy will, for Thou art my God.
For in Thee is the fountain of life;
in Thy light shall we see light.
O continue Thy mercy unto them that know Thee.
Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal, have mercy on us.
Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal, have mercy on us.
Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal, have mercy on us.
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit;
Both now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.
Translation by Holy Transfiguration Monastery, from The Great Horologion, 101-102.

For me this hymn of praise is as much a prayer as it is a praise.   Outside of Great Lent, I think the Great Doxology ranks as one of my all time favorite Orthodox hymns. 

I close this with my favorite part which is my daily prayer:

Lord, Thou hast been our refuge from generation to generation.
I said: O Lord, have mercy on me;
heal my soul, for I have sinned against Thee.
Lord, unto Thee have I fled for refuge;
teach me to do Thy will, for Thou art my God.
For in Thee is the fountain of life;
in Thy light shall we see light.

Blogging Through the Alphabet

This post is linked up to Blogging Through The Alphabet hosted by Marcy at Ben and Me.   This week focuses on the letter D.

3 comments:

  1. I love it when I slip in church in time for the Doxology.
    I've heard tell of the Protestant Doxology, but never heard it, that I'm aware of, but I do know that beginning.
    Is it sung?

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  2. Yes, it is sung. It's not one that I've really liked though and I'm only familiar with it because it is two of my beginning piano hymnal books from when we were first learning to play piano. It really wasn't sung at any of the protestant churches I had attended.

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  3. Thank you! I should You Tube it, thank you.
    Where I originally heard it, in a Protestant context, was when watching a TV program about the McGaughy (sp?) septuplets when they first arrived.

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